Writer

Books

Morality and Social Policy

 

“With an increasingly bitter secular religious divide, there is a messy, defective relationship between the state and morality in the UK. In response, Morality and Public Policy puts forward proposals to enhance the capacity of public policy to respond more effectively to morality and associated shifts in social mores in different cultural settings. Spanning religion, moral philosophy and scientific understanding of the human condition, this unique book draws together and adds to the latest thinking on morality, its causes, mutations, tensions and common features. It challenges misplaced concepts of ‘moral progress’ and the supremacy of empathy, and puts forward the management of the full span of human impulses - some complementary, some conflicting - as the function of morality with major implications for the interface between morality and public policy.”

 

“Morality and public policy have long had a complicated, tense relationship—the product, at least in part, of growing secularism and unclear lines between the state and questions of morality. This book looks at that tension and explores ways that both scholars and practitioners can enhance the capability of public policy to understand moral questions, respond flexibly and quickly to changes in social mores, and take account of different cultural contexts that could lead to unexpected responses to particular policies. It is the best look we’ve had yet at the moral core of public policy—what it is and what it could be.”

Policy Press at the University of Bristol

The University of Chicago Press

© 2016

“Henricson eschews the simplistic polarisations that so often characterise the discussion of morality in the public sphere. Her engaging book combines a subtle and balanced analysis with a convincing case that policy makers can and should do morality better.”

Matthew Taylor, CEO, Royal Society for the Encouragement of Arts

Manufactures and Commerce, UK

“An original analysis of the connections between moral sphere and public policy. Henricson has produced a book of major significance to our understanding of how governments should do morality.”

Professor Kimmo Jokinen, University of Jyväskylä, Finland

A Revolution in Family Policy.

Where we should go from here.

 

“This book offers a radical rethink of family policy in the UK.

Clem Henricson, the family policy expert, analyses in detail the major shift in the role of the state viz a viz personal relationships in recent years, with its aspirations to reduce child poverty, increase social mobility and deliver social cohesion.

Brought in by New Labour and carried forward, albeit in diluted form, by the Coalition, Henricson asks whether this philosophy of social betterment through manipulating the parent-child relationship is appropriate for family policy. She challenges the thinking behind the expectation that you can change a highly unequal society through the family route.

Instead the argument is made for a family policy with its own raison d'etre, free of other government agendas. A premium is set on the need to manage the multiple core tensions in families of affection, empathy and supportiveness on the one hand and aggression, deception and self interest on the other. A set of coherent support and control polices for family relations are developed which endorse this awareness and embrace a fundamental shift in perspective for future progressive governments.”

 

“A stimulating, challenging, and timely debate, this book is critical reading for family and social policy analysts or anyone interested in productive social programs in this era of economic austerity.”

Policy Press at the University of Bristol

The University of Chicago Press

© 2012

"A brilliant analysis of 'family policies' under New Labour, and of how they could and should be developed in the future."

Professor Alan Deacon, University of Leeds

“Reading the book would benefit everyone from the first year undergraduate through to senior academics and researchers who are unlikely to have the breadth of knowledge that Henricson possesses.”

Journal of Social Policy

"In this insightful, readable and important contribution, Clem Henricson comprehensively maps the development of family policy in the UK and the successes, failures, hopes and disappointments under New Labour and the Coalition."

Professor Ilan Katz, University of New South Wales, Australia

The Child and Family Policy Divide.

Tensions, convergence and rights

 

“This analytical study examines the principal areas of social policy affected by the split between children's, parents' and families' interests and presents an overview of policy over the past twenty years. It draws on a literature review of UK government and EU documentation, together with family case law, that has implications for family policy in England and Wales. This timely review outlines significant principles to inform consistent policy development. It emphasises the importance of safeguarding children's rights and promoting child welfare and child protection. It also assesses ways of balancing the interests of adults and children and supporting the family as a whole where this is to common advantage. The book has implications for policy in England and Wales and will be of interest to those involved in child and family policy, family law and human rights.”

Joseph Rowntree Foundation

© 2005

Government and Parenting.

Is there a case for a policy review and parents' code?

 

“Despite the Government's commitment to parenting in its social exclusion and criminal justice agendas, a growth in family initiatives and a wide range of government departments concerned with the development of family policy, there is no overarching statement setting out the government's expectations of parents, or about the relationship that should pertain between state and parents in supporting children. This report questions whether these different government perspectives, which include some ambiguities as well as common themes, can be drawn together into a coherent statement about the role of parents. It considers how those perceptions are conveyed to parents, services and the wider public and includes a review of the documentation relating to the period of the present government's administration. The report also examines current legislation, government strategy and initiatives, ministerial speeches and other relevant government documentation. It identifies serious gaps and ambiguities in the Government's strategy, suggesting ways in which government messages about parenting might effectively be conveyed to parents and supporting services. This comprehensive review feeds the debate as to how the variety of indications about the role of parenting in different pieces of legislation, discussion documents and other communications might be synthesised into a strategic policy statement and possibly incorporated into legislation.”

Joseph Rowntree Foundation

© 2003

Books

 

Clem Henricson has written and published the following books as well as numerous articles and reports.

 

Henricson, C. (2016) Morality and Public Policy. Bristol: Policy Press

 

Henricson, C. (2012) A Revolution in Family Policy. Bristol: Policy Press.

 

Wollny,I., Apps. J. and Henricson, C. (2010) Can Government Measure Family Wellbeing? London: Family and Parenting Institute.

 

Henricson, C. (2007) The Contractual Culture and Family Services. London: Family and Parenting Institute.

 

Henricson, C. (2006) ‘The Child and Family Policy Divide’ in J. Gunning and S. Holm, eds. Ethics, Law and Society, Vol. 2. Aldershot: Ashgate.

 

Henricson, C. and Rutter, M. (2005) Families and the State: two way support and responsibilities. The report of the Commission on Families and the Wellbeing of Children. Bristol: Policy Press.

 

Henricson, C. and Bainham, A.  (2005) The Child and Family Policy Divide. York: Joseph Rowntree Foundation.

 

Henricson, C. (2003) Government and Parenting: Is there a case for a policy review and a parents’ code. York: Joseph Rowntree Foundation.

 

Henricson, C. (2002) The Future for Family Services in England and Wales. London: National Family and Parenting Institute.

 

Henricson, C., Katz, I., Mesie, J., Sandison, M. and Tunstill, J. (2001) National Mapping of Family Services in England and Wales. London: National Family and Parenting Institute.

 

Henricson, C. and Grey, A. (2001) Understanding Discipline: an Overview of Child Discipline Practices and their Implications for Family Support.  London: National Family and Parenting Institute.

 

Henricson, C. (2001)’Parenting and youth crime’  in J. Coleman and D. Roker (eds.) Support for the Parents of Teenagers. London: Jessica Kingsley.

 

Henricson, C. (1999) Proposals for a National Alcohol Strategy for England . London:  Alcohol Concern.

 

Crime and Social Policy Committee (member) (1995) Crime and Social Policy. London:  NACRO.

 

Utting, D., Bright, J. and Henricson, C. (1994) Crime and the Family. Improving Child Rearing and Preventing Delinquency  London: Family Policy Studies Centre.

 

Henricson, C. (1994) Southwark Family Portraits London: Southwark Council

 

Editor

 

Family Research and Policy series - National Family and Parenting Institute. Books include:

 

Utting, D. (2009) Assessing and Meeting the Need for Parenting Support Services. London: Family and Parenting Institute

 

Klett-Davies, M., Skaliotis, E. and Wollny, I. (2009) Mapping and Analysis of Parenting Services in England. London: Family and Parenting Institute

 

Cotton, D., Reynolds, J. and Apps, J. (2009) Training for Parenting Support. London: Family and Parenting Institute

 

Virgo, S. (2009) Delivering Parenting Support Services.  London: Family and Parenting Institute

 

Pedace, L. (2008) Child Wellbeing in England, Scotland and Wales: Comparisons and Variations. London: Family and Parenting Institute

 

Barrett, H. (2008) Hard to Reach Families. London: Family and Parenting Institute

 

Husain, F. (2007) Cultural Competence in Family Support. London: Family and Parenting Institute

 

Barrett. H. (2006) Attachment. London: National Family and Parenting Institute

 

Goldman, R. (2005) Fathers’ Involvement in their Children’s Education. London: National Family and Parenting Institute

 

Barrett, H. (2004) . UK Family Trends 1994 – 2004. London: National Family and Parenting Institute

 

Olsen, R. and Tyers, H. (2004) Think Parent. Supporting Disabled Adults as Parents. London: National Family and Parenting Institute

 

Bhabra, S. and Ghate, D. (2004) Parent Information Point: Evaluation of the Pilot Phase. London: National Family and Parenting Institute

 

O’Brien, M., (2004)  Fathers and Family Support : Promoting Involvement and Evaluating Impact.  London: National Family and Parenting Institute

 

Barrett, H. (2003) Parenting Programmes for Families at Risk. London: National Family and Parenting Institute

 

Becher, H. and Husain, F. (2003) Supporting Minority Ethnic Families . London: National Family and Parenting Institute

 

Moorman, A. and Ball, M. (2001) Understanding Parents’ Needs: A Review of Parents’ Surveys

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ClemHenricson 2017

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ClemHenricson 2017